Free Phone Tracer
 

Google Cell Number Lookup

Posted on February 28, 2012



How to Get Google Voice Closer to Perfect

Google Voice was designed for convenience. As early as 2009, Google Voice members were allowed to select their own Google Voice cell device number. Instead of being linked to a particular device, this web-based contact number could be linked to cell device, work device and home device numbers, allowing all of the users devices to ring at the same time. Finally, it was easy for users to enjoy true telephone integration. Google Voice's speech-to-text feature was designed to add additional convenience. All of the user's voice mail messages were automatically converted to text and sent directly to a Gmail account.

When used correctly, this new technology ensures that people never miss another contact call. A home device rings at work; the mobile device can ring on the land line device. If a user only has access to an internet connection, he's still in luck. As long as he remains connected to the internet, the emails of translated messages let him know exactly when a call came in and what it was regarding.

The only problem is that its voice to text translation feature doesn't work very well. It can completely mangle voice mail messages, making it impossible to figure out who is calling. While Google Voice has features that allow users to report and identify spam, spam still gets through the system. Combine spam voice mail with messages that are difficult to understand, and it becomes difficult to figure out who needs to be responded to, unless the user calls into voice mail and listens to the message the old fashioned way.

But the tech mega-company continues to refine Google Voice, giving it significant advantages over traditional telephony. It has apps that work with smartphones. When the text translations work, voicemail becomes searchable, synching is easy, and the product plays well with other Google applications. This is certainly a product that one shouldn't give up on.

Still, the question remains: Is there a way to make sense of Google's mangled text transcripts or at least figure out who has called, without having to actually dial a number on a phone?

When it isn't possible to read the transcribed message, Google reverse phone lookups makes it easy to identify callers. The telephone number that is provided with the audio message transcript is always accurate. Simply look the number up in an online Google reverse phone directory, and you'll know who is calling. This clue may may help you decipher the message and figure out what the call was about--or at least know whether it is a call worth attending to.

So how do you access one of these directories? Type "Google Reverse Phone Lookup" into any browser and you'll be inundated with options. Freephonetracer.com is a good place to start. This directory is an excellent resource for conducting a reverse phone lookup.

Now you can know exactly where that mystery audio message came from, even when the email is poorly transcribed. Once you figure out what the actual message is, you know whether you can disregard the call or whether you need to go find a phone.


Searching

Now Searching...

Ex: 555-555-5555


Recent Trace Phone Numbers Articles